Jones, Samuel Riddle 1a

Birth Name Jones, Samuel Riddle 2a 3a 4a 5a 6a 7 8a 9 10
Also Known As
Gender male
Age at Death 75 years, 6 months, 26 days

Narrative

Misc. places in Ohio: http://goo.gl/maps/Wj55m
Poss. son of Rev. Thomas G. Jones, of Wooster.
Possible brother: John D. Jones, b. 1815; lived in Wooster, OH in 1838. http://www.heritagepursuit.com/Ashland/Ashland1876P350.htm

Narrative

Records not imported into INDI (individual) Gramps ID I12332364649:

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Line ignored as not understood Line 4888: 3 _APID 1,6742::8515082
Line ignored as not understood Line 4896: 3 _APID 1,1125::25122
Line ignored as not understood Line 4899: 3 _APID 1,7667::37133124
Line ignored as not understood Line 4901: 3 _APID 1,60541::2528577
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Events

Event Date Place Description Sources
Birth 24 April 1808 Virginia, USA   3b 4b 6b 8b 9 10
Residence about 1825 Buffaloe, Brooke, West Virginia, USA A pupil of Christian Reformist Thomas Campbell and was typesetter for Alexander Campbell's "Christian Baptist". “Buffaloe Creek” was the location of the Campbell Estate. The area would later be named after the estate, “Bethany”.  
Residence 25 May 1833 Wellsburg, Brooke, Virginia, USA Printer and proprietor of "Brooke Republican", Daniel Polsley, Ed.; through 11 Jul 1833 11a 12a
Residence 27 October 1833 Massillon, Stark, Ohio, USA Published newspaper, which failed which under subsequent owners became the "Massillon Whig" (which also failed). 13a 14a
Residence 27 October 1833 Massillon, Stark, Ohio, USA   15
Residence 1837 - 1842 Zanesville, Muskingum, Ohio, USA   16a 16b 16c 17a
Residence 30 March 1846 Utica, Hinds, Mississippi, USA At the time of the death of his wife, Caroline.  
Occupation 1850 - 1851 Memphis, Shelby, Tennessee, USA Editor of "The Medical Reformer", "Devoted to the advancement of the Science of Medicine as taught in the Botanico Medical College of Memphis, Tennessee."  
Residence 1 June 1850 Hinds County, Mississippi   3c
Occupation 1855 - 1856 Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA Chair of "Botany, Therapeutics, and Materia Medica" of the Physio-Medical College.  
Residence 1856 Palestine, Crawford, Illinois, USA Publisher of “The Ruralist” 18a 19a
Residence 1857 - 1861 Wooster, Wayne, Ohio, USA Pastor of the Christian Church 20a 19b 21a
Residence 1 June 1860 Beardstown, Cass, Illinois, USA Age in 1860: 52 8c
Residence 1862 - 1880 Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi, US In 1880, he lived on Jefferson Street, near the Capitol. 4c 19c 22a
Occupation 1870 Crystal Springs, Copiah, Mississippi, USA Editor & publisher of "Christian Unitist" for The Christian Church. Various records indicate in Crystal Springs, Garner and Jackson. 23a 20b
Organization 3 June 1875 Kosciusko, Attala, Mississippi, USA Officer of the Mississippi Press Association; Jackson Sunburst  
Death 20 November 1883 Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi, USA "age 74, of general debility. From Hinds Co." Source: The Clarion (Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi, USA), December 19, 1883, p 3, c. 4. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016925/1883-12-19/ed-1/seq-3/ 10
Burial 20 November 1883 Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi, USA City Cemetery; unknown plot (In 2016 it is named “Greenwood Cemetery”) 10
_MTTAG     @[email protected]  
Birth 24 April 1808 Virginia, USA    

Families

Family of Jones, Samuel Riddle and Neff, Caroline B

Married Wife Neff, Caroline B ( * 24 March 1815 + 30 March 1846 )
   
Event Date Place Description Sources
Marriage 28 October 1833 Ohio County, Virginia, USA 28th day of unknown month. “October” is recorded here as the record suggests that it was not before October. Probably at the new “small brick church house”, in West Liberty.; Presided by G. W. Robinson (ME Church, Pittsburgh Conference?) 7 13b
  Children
Name Birth Date Death Date
Jones, Mary Jabout 1838
Jones, William Oabout 18417 April 1862
Jones, Charles Tabout 1844

Family of Jones, Samuel Riddle and Fisher, Miranda Barnwell

Married Wife Fisher, Miranda Barnwell ( * 29 November 1829 + May 1884 )
   
Event Date Place Description Sources
Marriage 9 November 1846 Hinds County, Mississippi, USA Possibly in Utica. (see Botanico-Medical Recorder of September 12, 1846, p. 310.); See also General William Clark. 2b 5b
Marriage 9 November 1846 Hinds County, Mississippi, USA    
  Children
Name Birth Date Death Date
Jones, Virginia Caroline184727 August 1895
Jones, Mary Jabout 184828 October 1909
Jones, Eugene Fisher5 August 18562 December 1936
Jones, Maria Babout 1859
Jones, Paul Lee5 October 18602 May 1912

Attributes

Type Value Notes Sources
Merged Gramps ID I19871609513
 

Source References

  1. Ancestry Family Trees
      • Page: Ancestry Family Trees
  2. Ancestry.com: Mississippi Marriages, 1826-50
      • Source text:

        Marriage date: 9 November 1846
        Marriage place: Hinds, Mississippi</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=jeamms&h=8575&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

      • Source text:

        Marriage date: 9 November 1846
        Marriage place: Hinds, Mississippi</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=jeamms&h=8575&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

  3. Ancestry.com: 1850 United States Federal Census
      • Page: Year: 1850; Census Place: , Hinds, Mississippi; Roll: M432_372; Page: 163A; Image: .
      • Source text:

        Birth date: abt 1808
        Birth place: Virginia
        Residence date: 1850
        Residence place: Hinds, Mississippi</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1850usfedcenancestry&h=3415173&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

      • Page: Year: 1850; Census Place: , Hinds, Mississippi; Roll: M432_372; Page: 163A; Image: .
      • Source text:

        Birth date: abt 1808
        Birth place: Virginia
        Residence date: 1850
        Residence place: Hinds, Mississippi</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1850usfedcenancestry&h=3415173&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

      • Page: Year: 1850; Census Place: , Hinds, Mississippi; Roll: M432_372; Page: 163A; Image: .
      • Source text:

        Birth date: abt 1808
        Birth place: Virginia
        Residence date: 1850
        Residence place: Hinds, Mississippi</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1850usfedcenancestry&h=3415173&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

  4. Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: 1880 United States Federal Census
      • Page: Year: 1880; Census Place: Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi; Roll: 648; Family History Film: 1254648; Page: 37B; Enumeration District: 2; Image: 0443.
      • Source text:

        Birth date: abt 1808
        Birth place: Virginia
        Residence date: 1880
        Residence place: Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi, United States</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1880usfedcen&h=8515082&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

      • Page: Year: 1880; Census Place: Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi; Roll: 648; Family History Film: 1254648; Page: 37B; Enumeration District: 2; Image: 0443.
      • Source text:

        Birth date: abt 1808
        Birth place: Virginia
        Residence date: 1880
        Residence place: Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi, United States</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1880usfedcen&h=8515082&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

      • Page: Year: 1880; Census Place: Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi; Roll: 648; Family History Film: 1254648; Page: 37B; Enumeration District: 2; Image: 0443.
      • Source text:

        Birth date: abt 1808
        Birth place: Virginia
        Residence date: 1880
        Residence place: Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi, United States</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1880usfedcen&h=8515082&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

  5. Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp.: Mississippi Marriages, 1826-1900
      • Source text:

        Marriage date: 09 Nov 1846
        Marriage place: Hinds, MS</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=msmarr1851&h=8573&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

      • Source text:

        Marriage date: 09 Nov 1846
        Marriage place: Hinds, MS</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=msmarr1851&h=8573&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

  6. Ancestry.com: Mississippi State and Territorial Census Collection, 1792-1866
      • Source text:

        Birth date: abt 1808
        Birth place: Virginia
        Residence date: 25 Oct 1850
        Residence place: Hinds, Mississippi, United States</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=msstatecen&h=25122&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

      • Source text:

        Birth date: abt 1808
        Birth place: Virginia
        Residence date: 25 Oct 1850
        Residence place: Hinds, Mississippi, United States</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=msstatecen&h=25122&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

  7. Ancestry.com: West Virginia, Marriages Index, 1785-1971
  8. Ancestry.com: 1860 United States Federal Census
      • Page: Year: 1860; Census Place: Beardstown, Cass, Illinois; Roll: M653_160; Page: 234; Image: 235; Family History Library Film: 803160
      • Page: Year: 1860; Census Place: Beardstown, Cass, Illinois; Roll: M653_160; Page: 234; Image: 235; Family History Library Film: 803160
      • Page: Year: 1860; Census Place: Beardstown, Cass, Illinois; Roll: M653_160; Page: 234; Image: 235; Family History Library Film: 803160
  9. Ancestry.com: Global, Find A Grave Index for Burials at Sea and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current
  10. Ancestry.com: U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
  11. Newton, J. H., Editor: History of the Pan-Handle: Being Historical Collections of the Counties of Ohio, Brooke, Marshall and Hancock, West Virginia
      • Date: 1879
      • Page: pp. 328-329
      • Source text:

        Saturday, May 25, 1833, the first number of the Brooke Republican made its appearance. Daniel Polsley was editor and S. R. Jones, printer and proprietor. January 4, 1834, the name of S. R. Jones as printer and proprietor, does not appear in the paper any longer.
        Thursday, September 24, 1835, was the last issue of the Brooke Republican. The VVellsburg Gazette was still in existence at that time, but it did not exist long afterwards; but at what date it terminated its existence we are unable to learn. The Brooke Republican was a four page, twenty-four column paper, 18x14 inches, devoted to politics, foreign and domestic news, manufacturing and agriculture, and other interesting miscellany. It was a very able paper.

      • Citation:

        http://books.google.com/books?id=XXp5AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA328

  12. Norona, Delf, Ed.: West Virginia imprints, 1790-1863; a checklist of books, newspapers, periodicals, and broadsides
      • Page: p. 255
      • Citation:

        http://archive.org/stream/westvirginia00noro#page/253

  13. West Virginia Vital Research Records
      • Page: Id=12404585, Type=Marriage, 1833, Ohio County
      • Source text:

        Married by the Subscriber on the 28th
        Inst Mr. Samuel R. Jones to Miss
        Caroline Neff, the former of Massilon
        Ohio and the other of this Virginia
        G W Robinson
        A Copy Test
        Jno McColloch Clk

      • Citation:

        http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_mcdetail.aspx?Id=12404585

      • Citation:

        Other dates around this transcription include Sept, Nov and Dec 1833.

      • Page: Id=12404585, Type=Marriage, 1833, Ohio County
      • Source text:

        Married by the Subscriber on the 28th
        Inst Mr. Samuel R. Jones to Miss
        Caroline Neff, the former of Massilon
        Ohio and the other of this Virginia
        G W Robinson
        A Copy Test
        Jno McColloch Clk

      • Citation:

        http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_mcdetail.aspx?Id=12404585

      • Citation:

        Other dates around this transcription include Sept, Nov and Dec 1833.

  14. Massillon Independent
      • Date: July 5, 1871
      • Page: Vol. IX, No. 2, p.1, c. 3
      • Source text:

        INDEPENDENT. MASSILLON NEWSPAPER SKETCHES...The enterprise was not profitable, and the whigs believing that they could run a newspaper purchased the concern, and put a man into it by the name of S. R. Jones, who made a sad failure and left the paper on the hands of his securities...

      • Citation:

        http://newspaperarchive.com/massillon-independent/1871-07-05?page=1

      • Citation:

        The article is a letter that recounts the history of newspapers in Massillon. The name of the paper at the time and the year are not mentioned, but the previously known name was "Massillon Democrat", an unlikely name for a Whig newspaper. The subsequently known name was “Massillon Whig”, and it might have had this name.

  15. Affleck, Thomas, Editor: The Western Farmer and Gardener
      • Date: December 1841
      • Page: Vol. III, No. III, pp. 58-49
      • Source text:

        Trembles or Milk Sickness.
        ...
        ...Rhus toxicodendron...
        ...
        ... S. R JONES.
        Mulberry Grove, Zanesville,
        Tuesday, Sept. 1 1841.

      • Citation:

        http://books.google.com/books?id=6SlOAAAAYAAJ&pg=IA328

      • Date: January, 1842
      • Page: Vol. III, No. VI, pp. 127-129
      • Source text:

        Trembles or Milk-Sickness.
        Mt. Carmle, Illinois
        January 17, 1842.
        ...
        Yours, TH. S. HINDE.
        ---
        Accompanying the above letter of my venerable correspondent...
        ...
        ...Capt. Hampson, in the Hocking Valley, under the excellent superintendence of J. T. Brasee, Esq., of Lancaster...
        ...
        I therefore close with my thanks to Mr. Hinde for his prompt attention to my wishes.
        Yours, &amp;c.&amp;c., Respectfully,
        Feb. 8th, 1842. S. R. JONES.

      • Citation:

        http://books.google.com/books?id=6SlOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA127

      • Citation:

        Lancaster is 40 mi WSW of Zanesville, OH
        Hocking Valley is 17 mi SSE of Lancaster, OH.

      • Date: March, 1842
      • Page: Vol. III, No. 6, pp. 131-132
      • Source text:

        For the Western Farmer and Gardener.
        Common Schools No. 1.</line><line /><line>Mr. Editor :</line><line /><line>My attention was called to the subject of common schools, by an article in your paper for December last. The import­ance of the subject, and the hope of being able to say something new upon it, are the only apologies I shall offer for my present communication.</line><line /><line>That upon the proper education of all the people depends the prosperity of our country and the permanency of our civil insti­tu­tions, is a truth which is no longer con­tro­vert­ed; and the only question now is, how shall this education be given with the great­est certainty, and at the least cost?</line><line /><line>There can be no doubt that the most certain, as well as the cheapest method of educating the whole people is the establish­ment of common schools throughout the length and breadth of the land. This our legislature has attempted to do. But these schools are so badly salaried, and so little provision is made for the comfort and convenience of teachers, that but few men well qualified</line><line /><line>* * * “To rear the tender thought,
        And teach the young idea how to shoot,”</line><line /><line>can be induced to undertake the task, and those few too generally make it a mere stepping stone to other and more profita­ble professions, and hence the system has fallen infinitely short of attaining its object. To suggest a plan for the removal of this evil is the object of this communication.</line><line /><line>Men devoted to science and literature, such as we wish at the head of our com­mon schools, are rarely ambitious of the turmoil of political, the perplexity of legal, the labor of medical, or the activity of mercantile life. They are usually more rural and retiring in their dispositions and habits, and are content with an easy and a certain competence, and a sylvan home in some sequestered shade. But neither easy nor certain employment, much less competence, belongs to our school system as at present organized. Hence the very men we need as teachers, are the least likely to become such, and surely if we would act the part of wisdom, we would at once remove these objections.</line><line /><line>But how shall we remove the unnecessary labors and vexations which now weigh down the business of teaching, and make it permanent, pleasant and profit­able? How shall we make it desira­ble, especially to such men as would hon­or the profession, and benefit the country?</line><line /><line>These questions are but partially answered in the article alluded to above. Concert of action among teachers, and the establishment of a teacher’s profession, will do much to attain these ends; but they will not finish the work: for it is in vain that we create a profession without attaching to it perquisites, honors, and emoluments. So long, therefore, as the only perquisite, attached to the business of teaching, is the poor privilege of being “growled” at by every one; so long as the only honor is the consciousness of an honest attempt to perform one’s duty; and so long as the only emolument is a pitiable pittance grudgingly given; it is utterly fruitless to dignify it with the name of a “profession” in the hope of rendering it more permanent, and of elevating it to its proper rank among the learned pursuits of the age. Something more agreeable and substantial than these must be devised as the teacher’s reward; and, depend upon it, as soon as we throw around the teacher certain rights, privileges, and immunities, which he shall attain to, by virtue of his profession; as soon as we make that profession sufficiently durable to enable him</line><line /><line>“To read his honors in his pupil’s lives;”</line><line /><line>and as soon as we create permanent salaries, varying according to the attainments of the teacher and the arduousness of his labors; we will have accomplished our task, and not before: and I care not how vigilantly we may guard the portals of the profession, how high the attainments, and how rigid the examination we may require, our school houses would soon be filled with men of the right kind, and the cry would be not for good teachers as it now is; but for good places for such teachers.</line><line /><line>I agree then, with with the proposition to establish a teacher’s profession; but I propose further to establish perquisites, honors and emoluments, suitable to that profession, and adequate to the attainments of its great object.</line><line /><line>But my sheet is already full, and I must leave “my plan” for a future number.</line><line /><line>S. R. JONES.
        Zanesville, O., Feb. 15th, 1842.

      • Citation:

        http://books.google.com/books?id=6SlOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA131

  16. Pickett, John W., A. M., Editor: The Western Academician and Journal of Education and Science
      • Date: April 1837
      • Page: p. 335
      • Source text:

        The Annual Report of the Proceedings of the Muskingum County Lyceum of Practical Teachers, at their meetings, held in March and April, 1837, with an address to the friends of Education.—Zanesville.
        We received from the Vice President, Mr. S. R. Jones, the pamphlet whose name heads this article, and have perused it with great satisfaction. We are glad to see the spirit abroad in the great cause of education—the cause of human nature—and to hear of the laudable exertions by teachers to give tone and character to their profession. The voice of the people from every quarter, is becoming loud, that our academic institutions—colleges, private academies and public schools—are the strongest and surest protection of our national liberties and the morals of the people, and that the conductors of these establishments deserve and should receive the steady co-operation of the public, and an ample compensation for their high and valuable labors. The spirit, now awake, if it be true to itself, will fill our educational halls with men of stern integrity, lofty feeling, and extensive literary and scientific acquirements.
        The proceedings of the Lyceum give ample evidence of the zeal of its members, and we heartily wish them success in their profession, which, we have no doubt, they will receive from the intelligent citizens of Zanesville and country adjacent.

  17. Chronicling America
      • Page: LCCN: sn 91054029
      • Source text:

        Title:
        The ruralist. : (Palestine, Ill.) 1856-18??
        Place of publication:
        Palestine, Ill.
        Geographic coverage:
        Palestine, Crawford, Illinois | View more titles from this: City County, State
        Publisher:
        S.R. Jones
        Dates of publication:
        1856-18??
        Description:
        Began in 1856.
        Frequency:
        Weekly
        Language:
        English
        Subjects:
        Palestine (Ill.)--Newspapers.
        Notes:
        Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 14 (Aug. 28, 1856).
        Latest issue consulted: Aug. 27, 1857.
        LCCN:
        sn 91054029
        OCLC:
        23274594

      • Citation:

        http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91054029/

  18. Perrin, William H.: History of Crawford and Clark Counties, Illinois
      • Date: 1883
      • Page: p. 80, col. 2
      • Source text:

        The Ruralist. — This was the next newspaper venture, and was established in Palestine, in 1856, by Samuel R. Jones, a native Virginian, who had been brought up by Alexander Campbell, the eminent minister of the gospel and expounder of the doctrine and faith of the religious denomination known as Disciples or Christians. The Ruralist, like its predecessors, was independent in politics. Jones was rather an eccentric man, with numerous professions, combining those of a preacher, lawyer and doctor, with that of editor and publisher. He was imbued with the spirit of “Reform” in almost everything, and was disposed to make the paper a special advocate of his own peculiar notions and isms. In December, 1856, George W. Harper, a printer boy of some eighteen years, came from Richmond, Indiana, and was employed by Jones to take mechanical charge of the Ruralist, and as he had “so many irons in the fire,” he soon virtually surrendered all charge of the paper into Harper’s hands, who endeavored to make it more of a literary and local paper than it had been previously. Its publication was continued until October, 1857, when it was suspended, and Dr. Jones removed to Wooster, Ohio, to take pastoral charge of the Christian church there. He remained about a year, and just prior to the breaking out of the late war, he removed to Mississippi. After the close of the war himself and son published for a short time a religious paper at Garner, Hinds County, that State. He is now located at Jackson, Miss., and although over seventy years of age is still actively engaged in the ministry.

      • Citation:

        http://archive.org/stream/historyofcrawfor00perr#page/n83/mode/1up

      • Date: 1883
      • Page: p. 80, col. 2
      • Source text:

        The Ruralist. — This was the next newspaper venture, and was established in Palestine, in 1856, by Samuel R. Jones, a native Virginian, who had been brought up by Alexander Campbell, the eminent minister of the gospel and expounder of the doctrine and faith of the religious denomination known as Disciples or Christians. The Ruralist, like its predecessors, was independent in politics. Jones was rather an eccentric man, with numerous professions, combining those of a preacher, lawyer and doctor, with that of editor and publisher. He was imbued with the spirit of “Reform” in almost everything, and was disposed to make the paper a special advocate of his own peculiar notions and isms. In December, 1856, George W. Harper, a printer boy of some eighteen years, came from Richmond, Indiana, and was employed by Jones to take mechanical charge of the Ruralist, and as he had “so many irons in the fire,” he soon virtually surrendered all charge of the paper into Harper’s hands, who endeavored to make it more of a literary and local paper than it had been previously. Its publication was continued until October, 1857, when it was suspended, and Dr. Jones removed to Wooster, Ohio, to take pastoral charge of the Christian church there. He remained about a year, and just prior to the breaking out of the late war, he removed to Mississippi. After the close of the war himself and son published for a short time a religious paper at Garner, Hinds County, that State. He is now located at Jackson, Miss., and although over seventy years of age is still actively engaged in the ministry.

      • Citation:

        http://archive.org/stream/historyofcrawfor00perr#page/n83/mode/1up

      • Date: 1883
      • Page: p. 80, col. 2
      • Source text:

        The Ruralist. — This was the next newspaper venture, and was established in Palestine, in 1856, by Samuel R. Jones, a native Virginian, who had been brought up by Alexander Campbell, the eminent minister of the gospel and expounder of the doctrine and faith of the religious denomination known as Disciples or Christians. The Ruralist, like its predecessors, was independent in politics. Jones was rather an eccentric man, with numerous professions, combining those of a preacher, lawyer and doctor, with that of editor and publisher. He was imbued with the spirit of “Reform” in almost everything, and was disposed to make the paper a special advocate of his own peculiar notions and isms. In December, 1856, George W. Harper, a printer boy of some eighteen years, came from Richmond, Indiana, and was employed by Jones to take mechanical charge of the Ruralist, and as he had “so many irons in the fire,” he soon virtually surrendered all charge of the paper into Harper’s hands, who endeavored to make it more of a literary and local paper than it had been previously. Its publication was continued until October, 1857, when it was suspended, and Dr. Jones removed to Wooster, Ohio, to take pastoral charge of the Christian church there. He remained about a year, and just prior to the breaking out of the late war, he removed to Mississippi. After the close of the war himself and son published for a short time a religious paper at Garner, Hinds County, that State. He is now located at Jackson, Miss., and although over seventy years of age is still actively engaged in the ministry.

      • Citation:

        http://archive.org/stream/historyofcrawfor00perr#page/n83/mode/1up

  19. Benjamin Franklin Manire: Reminiscences of Preachers and Churches in Mississippi
      • Page: Ch. 4 “1860‑1866”
      • Source text:

        One Sunday morning in the spring of 1866, Dr. S. R. Jones dropped in on us at New Bethel, unannounced and unexpected. I had seen his name in some of our papers before the war; but knew not what manner of man he was. He staid with me some days during which we had a "feast of reason and flow of soul." From that time onward till we parted in the latter part of 1876 to meet no more on earth, the relation between us was virtually that of father and son. In his boyhood, he was a pupil of Thomas Campbell, and as the printer boy set type for the pages of the "Christian Baptist." In his early life, he was personally acquainted with all the prominent co‑laborers of Mr. Campbell in Virginia and Ohio, and thus had exceptionable advantages for the training both of his mind and heart. His reminiscences of those great men and their labors were deeply interesting and instructive. He was a man of extensive and varied information. As a printer, an editor, a lawyer, physician, and a preacher, he could have set up a man in each of these professions, and still have had a good stock of information left. Years before the war, he lived at or near Utica, Mississippi, and practiced medicine, preaching also whenever and wherever he had the opportunity. It was at Utica, I think, that he lost his first wife and married his second who was a sister of judge Fisher. Although much younger than he was, she survived him but a short time. At one time he filled a chair in a Medical College in Memphis, Tenn. He was living in Ohio when the war broke out, but returned to Mississippi, and located at or near Preston, where he practiced medicine for a number of years. He then lived at Garner's Station for a year or two, and from that place he removed to Crystal Springs, where he started the "Christian Unitist". In a short time however, he removed from that place to Jackson, and remained there or in its vicinity until he died.</line><line /><line> He was an elegant writer and a close reasoner. The subject‑matter of his sermons was always sound and instructive, and his language chaste and appropriate; but in consequence of an injury which his vocal organs received when he was quite a young man, he had an impediment in his delivery which greatly hindered his usefulness as a preacher. Had he possessed a smooth and flowing delivery he would have stood well up to the front among our able and popular preachers. His defect in this respect drew me perhaps still nearer to him; for "a fellow feeling makes us wondrous kind." A bad delivery has been my "thorn in the flesh" during all my preacher‑life, and a sharp thorn indeed it has been. If Paul's was any worse than mine has been, I am sorry for him even now. I have never been able to decide whether mine was from the Lord, or the adversary‑whether the Lord gave it to me to keep me from becoming vain and puffed up, or the adversary to hinder my usefulness. At any rate it has determined to a great extent my fields of labor, keeping me in the background mostly, where perhaps I have done as much good, as I could have done in more prominent places with the tongue of a Cicero. I have preached almost all my life in places where, for the time being at least, they could not get any one else; and hence the good that has resulted from these labors has been so much clear gain. I have never been in any other preacher's way, and never intend to be; and I have no fear of any other preacher ever getting in my way. But all this concerning myself the reader "can put within parentheses and read in a lower tone of voice," as Bro. Butler was wont to say.</line><line /><line> With all his vast and varied information, the chief greatness of Dr. Jones was found in his pre‑eminent goodness. If I have ever known a man who was absolutely without any mark of guile, and totally destitute of all feelings of selfishness, Dr. S. R. Jones was that man. He seemed to think of the good of others only, and to labor for their good with an unwavering devotion. He loved everybody, and always had a sunny smile and pleasant word for all whom he met whether old or young, rich or poor, white or black. His very presence was a benediction to all. He was especially fond of children, and always tried to say something to make them happy. I have as little use for the man who is not fond of children, as Shakespeare had for the man who had no music in his soul. Such a man is "only fit for treason, stratagems, and spoils." That I knew him and possessed his confidence and affection to the fullest extent, will ever be a happy memory to me. He had the love and confidence of all who knew him; and I doubt if he ever had an enemy in all his life. Who could have been the enemy of such a man? His stainless life was above criticism and his unselfish love for his fellow man disarmed all hostility. Ever blessed be his memory!

      • Citation:

        http://www.therestorationmovement.com/harmon.htm#Reminiscence4

      • Page: Ch. 4 “1860‑1866”
      • Source text:

        One Sunday morning in the spring of 1866, Dr. S. R. Jones dropped in on us at New Bethel, unannounced and unexpected. I had seen his name in some of our papers before the war; but knew not what manner of man he was. He staid with me some days during which we had a "feast of reason and flow of soul." From that time onward till we parted in the latter part of 1876 to meet no more on earth, the relation between us was virtually that of father and son. In his boyhood, he was a pupil of Thomas Campbell, and as the printer boy set type for the pages of the "Christian Baptist." In his early life, he was personally acquainted with all the prominent co‑laborers of Mr. Campbell in Virginia and Ohio, and thus had exceptionable advantages for the training both of his mind and heart. His reminiscences of those great men and their labors were deeply interesting and instructive. He was a man of extensive and varied information. As a printer, an editor, a lawyer, physician, and a preacher, he could have set up a man in each of these professions, and still have had a good stock of information left. Years before the war, he lived at or near Utica, Mississippi, and practiced medicine, preaching also whenever and wherever he had the opportunity. It was at Utica, I think, that he lost his first wife and married his second who was a sister of judge Fisher. Although much younger than he was, she survived him but a short time. At one time he filled a chair in a Medical College in Memphis, Tenn. He was living in Ohio when the war broke out, but returned to Mississippi, and located at or near Preston, where he practiced medicine for a number of years. He then lived at Garner's Station for a year or two, and from that place he removed to Crystal Springs, where he started the "Christian Unitist". In a short time however, he removed from that place to Jackson, and remained there or in its vicinity until he died.</line><line /><line> He was an elegant writer and a close reasoner. The subject‑matter of his sermons was always sound and instructive, and his language chaste and appropriate; but in consequence of an injury which his vocal organs received when he was quite a young man, he had an impediment in his delivery which greatly hindered his usefulness as a preacher. Had he possessed a smooth and flowing delivery he would have stood well up to the front among our able and popular preachers. His defect in this respect drew me perhaps still nearer to him; for "a fellow feeling makes us wondrous kind." A bad delivery has been my "thorn in the flesh" during all my preacher‑life, and a sharp thorn indeed it has been. If Paul's was any worse than mine has been, I am sorry for him even now. I have never been able to decide whether mine was from the Lord, or the adversary‑whether the Lord gave it to me to keep me from becoming vain and puffed up, or the adversary to hinder my usefulness. At any rate it has determined to a great extent my fields of labor, keeping me in the background mostly, where perhaps I have done as much good, as I could have done in more prominent places with the tongue of a Cicero. I have preached almost all my life in places where, for the time being at least, they could not get any one else; and hence the good that has resulted from these labors has been so much clear gain. I have never been in any other preacher's way, and never intend to be; and I have no fear of any other preacher ever getting in my way. But all this concerning myself the reader "can put within parentheses and read in a lower tone of voice," as Bro. Butler was wont to say.</line><line /><line> With all his vast and varied information, the chief greatness of Dr. Jones was found in his pre‑eminent goodness. If I have ever known a man who was absolutely without any mark of guile, and totally destitute of all feelings of selfishness, Dr. S. R. Jones was that man. He seemed to think of the good of others only, and to labor for their good with an unwavering devotion. He loved everybody, and always had a sunny smile and pleasant word for all whom he met whether old or young, rich or poor, white or black. His very presence was a benediction to all. He was especially fond of children, and always tried to say something to make them happy. I have as little use for the man who is not fond of children, as Shakespeare had for the man who had no music in his soul. Such a man is "only fit for treason, stratagems, and spoils." That I knew him and possessed his confidence and affection to the fullest extent, will ever be a happy memory to me. He had the love and confidence of all who knew him; and I doubt if he ever had an enemy in all his life. Who could have been the enemy of such a man? His stainless life was above criticism and his unselfish love for his fellow man disarmed all hostility. Ever blessed be his memory!

      • Citation:

        http://www.therestorationmovement.com/harmon.htm#Reminiscence4

  20. Ben Douglass: History of Wayne County, Ohio, from the days of the pioneers and the first settlers to the present time
      • Date: 1879
      • Page: pp. 402-403
      • Source text:

        Church of Christ.
        The Church of Christ, meeting in Wooster, was organized July 26, 1835. The following statements are taken from the records of the church:
        At a meeting on Lord's Day, July 26, 1835, the persons whose names appear below extended to each other the hand of Christian fellowship, and organized themselves into a worshiping assembly, under the following pledge:
        We, the Disciples of Jesus Christ, living in and near the town of Wooster, being desirous of attending to all the ordinances of the Lord's House, do unite ourselves together in a congregated capacity, taking for our guide or discipline the New Testament of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. And we propose, as soon as practicable, to appoint Bishops and Deacons, whose duty it shall be to take charge of the temporal and spiritual interests of the congregation, according to the Holy Scriptures. And in order to protect ourselves from imposition, we further agree not to receive any person claiming to be a Christian who is not known by us, or who does not present a letter of commendation from some congregation. To the above we have authorized our several names to be affixed:
        Wm. F. Pool; Peter Willis and Elizabeth, his wife; Frederick Kauke and Elizabeth, his wife; John Miller and wife; Jacob Wachtel and Elizabeth, his wife; Samuel Zimmerman and Mary, his wife; George K. Zimmerman, Griffith L. Jones, Elizabeth Scott, Eleanor Jones, Mary McCurdy, Elizabeth Hickman, Rebecca Hull, Sophia Zimmerman, Kimball Porter and Susannah, his wife.
        From the time of this initiatory movement until May, 1847, there is no record of the proceedings of the church. But from some of the older members we learn that the little band continued to meet from week to week to "break the loaf" and to join in social exercises, whenever preaching could not be obtained. As an evidence of the zeal which characterized the members, we mention the fact that during their interval of twelve years the little company of twenty-one had increased to nearly one hundred.
        There is no record to be found of the election and ordination of officers until 1850. On Saturday, December 7, in that year the church met and unanimously selected the following persons as its officers: Elders, Kimball Porter, William Grim and Constant Lake; Deacons, George K. Zimmerman, Michael Miller and Martin Rowe.
        The following sisters were chosen as Deaconesses: Almira Grim, Mary Bartol, Barbary Hickman, Eleanor Lake, Mary Porter, Rebecca White, Arta Porter, Harriet Harbaugh and Hester Snook. On the next day, Lord's Day, December 8, at 2 o'clock p. M., the church met to attend to the ordination of these officers. Elder J. H. Jones was the officiating minister on this occasion.
        For several years the church had no house of worship. And indeed, it had no regular place of meeting. Part of the time it occupied the old Court House, where it had been organized. Sometimes it assembled in a brick school house in the south part of town, located on what is now known as South Market street. Another place of meeting was the residence of Frederick Kauke. And occasionally it worshiped in the dwelling houses of other members. For a time it occupied a cooper shop, situated on what, at present, is called Grant street. Then again, in a large room in J. S. Lake's building on West Liberty street. Finally, in the year 1847, *ne church completed a house of its own on the corner of Walnut and South streets, which house it has continued to occupy until the present time.
        The first regular pastor was J. H. Jones, who began his labors for the congregation in the year 1845. He remained in this position until 1857, and was succeeded in the pastoral work by the following persons in the order named: John W. Errett, Samuel R. Jones, Robert Moffett, N. A. Walker, J. H. Bauserman, J. N. Lowe, D. J. White and H. D. Carlton.
        In addition to its regular preaching, this church has frequently enjoyed the pulpit ministrations of eminent Evangelists. Prominent among them may be mentioned Alexander Campbell, Wm. Hayden, A. S. Hayden, John Henry, Wm. Pool, A. B. Green, James Porter, John Rigdon, John Secrist, Wesley Lamphere, C. E. Van Voorhes, Adamson Bently, John Whitacre, D. S. Burnett, Jasper Moss, M. Wilcox, Walter Scott, Isaac Erritt, W. K. Pendleton, C. L. Loos and Benjamin Franklin.
        It may be mentioned, as a matter of interest, that during the time that has elapsed since its organization about seven hundred persons have been members of the church; but the growth in numbers has been largely counteracted by removals. Many have been removed by letters to other congregations; some have died, and some have been excluded. The following persons are at present the officers of the church: Elders—Constant Lake, James W. Hughes, Silas H. Sharp, H. D. Carlton; Deacons—Alex. Garing, Wm. H. Smith, Henry Myers, Jehu L. Grafton; Deaconesses Elizabeth Sharp, Mary Bartol, Hannah Miller, Elizabeth Yamall, Anna P. Lake. H. D. C.

      • Citation:

        http://books.google.com/books?id=rjkuAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA402

      • Citation:

        Mamie Jones married a man surname "Sharp", possibly related to Silas?

  21. Geo. P. Rowell and Co.'s American newspaper directory
      • Date: 1873
      • Page: pp. 118-119
      • Source text:

        JACKSON, Christian Unitist ; sixty-four pages octavo; subscription $3 ; established 1870 ; S. R. Jones, editor ; S. R. Jones &amp; Son, publishers ; circulation 500, estimated.

      • Citation:

        http://archive.org/stream/geoprowellcosame1873newy#page/118/mode/1up

  22. Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Mississippi
      • Page: Vol. II, p. 369
      • Source text:

        In 1875 S. R. Jones edited a paper known as the Unitist, in the interest of the church.
        It continued for a year. or more and suspended.

      • Citation:

        http://archive.org/stream/cu31924066295209#page/n428/mode/1up