Residence

Date 1 June 1850
Place Bloomington, Monroe, Indiana, USA

Source References

  1. Ancestry.com: 1850 United States Federal Census
      • Page: Year: 1850; Census Place: Bloomington, Monroe, Indiana; Roll: M432_161; Page: 294A; Image: .
      • Source text:

        Birth date: abt 1782
        Birth place: North Carolina
        Residence date: 1850
        Residence place: Bloomington, Monroe, Indiana</line><line />

      • Citation:

        http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1850usfedcenancestry&h=2127482&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

  2. Hall, Forest M.: Historic Treasures; True Tales of Deeds...
      • Date: 1922
      • Page: pp. 22-24; “James Parks, Sr...wrote history of his life”
      • Source text:

        James Parks, Sr., one of first commissioners who laid out Bloomington as county seat — wrote history of his life — died at age of 101
        When Ninety-seven Years of Age, Old Pioneer Gave Realistic Account of
        Early Settlement and Organization of Monroe County — Served in State
        Legislature and Other Public Offices — Amusing Incidents Related.
        Among the early settlers of Mon-
        roe county was a man named James
        Parks, Sr., who settled with others in
        Richland township, in 1817 near what
        is now the site of Ellettsville, Ind. </line><line /><line>James Parks, Sr., then was about
        thirty-six years of age, and was con-
        sidered the leading man of the set-
        tlement. He lived to the remarkable
        age of 101 years, dying about 1882,
        having retained his energy with phe-
        nomenal constancy up to the very
        last years of his life. </line><line /><line>During his ninety-seventh year,
        Mr. Parks demonstrated his wonder-
        ful fertileness of mentality and
        strength of physic by writing a run-
        ning account of his life, which we
        herewith print and trust will prove
        interesting to the present genera-
        tion:
        [autobiography removed]
        We have carefully compared the
        above writing with notes of history,
        and old records, and by casual inquiry
        have verified the statements Mr.
        Parks made in his remarkable sketch
        of his own life events. </line><line /><line>Was Wonderful Man. </line><line /><line>When we consider the fact that
        this sketch was made by a man who
        has lived far beyond the age when
        most men have vitality enough to
        recount in verbal conversation sketches
        of early events, we must give James
        Parks credit for being of wonderful
        vitality to have produced this clear,
        understandable historic sketch. We
        trust that future generations in Monroe
        county's bounds may appreciate
        the fortitude of the sturdy pioneer in
        giving to us this rare morsel of true
        literature, [written] in such interesting
        manner, with due regard to details,
        without becoming dry or monotonous.
        Mr. Parks lived until 1882, four years
        after he had written the above sketch,
        and died at the age cf 101 years. </line><line /><line>We find that he touched upon only
        those points in his career which he
        deemed important to later genera-
        tions. Many other interesting things
        are told by neighbors, about Mr.
        Parks, as the following little epi-
        sode, which is quite amusing: </line><line /><line>One morning, very early, James
        Parks, Sr., was aroused from sleep
        before the usual time by a peculiar
        noise on the door step. Getting up
        as quietly as possible, Mr. Parks
        walked to a window which commanded
        a view of the door step. </line><line /><line>When he looked out, much to his
        astonishment and with some alarm, he
        saw a big black bear lying there
        asleep. </line><line /><line>The settler got his rifle, and taking
        cautious aim at a vital part of the
        animal's anatomy, pulled the trig-
        ger. The sharp report was followed
        by the death growls of Bruin, and in
        a few moments all was still; the bear
        was dead — the family ate bearsteak
        for breakfast.

      • Citation:

        http://archive.org/stream/historictreasure00hall#page/22